Once you realize that divorce is imminent, your immediate attention will turn toward details such as property and debt division, child support, spousal support, and child custody.

While all these things are important, as they relate to your finances and the well-being of your children, there’s something else to consider: your emotions.

Even if you understand that divorce is necessary to improving your life, you’ll still look back and wonder what went wrong in your marriage. After all, when you tied the knot you were hoping to stay with your spouse for the rest of your life.

There is no right or wrong way to deal with your emotions in divorce, as everyone has a different strategy for doing so. However, here are some tips that can help:

  • Don’t hide from your emotions: There’s nothing wrong with confronting your emotions head on. For example, if you’re sad about your divorce and feel like crying, go ahead and do so. Bottling everything up inside will only cause more stress and tension, and that’s not what you need at this time.
  • Create a support group: You don’t want to talk to your soon-to-be ex-spouse about what you’re feeling, but you still need to get your emotions into the open. And that’s why you should create a support group of friends and family who are willing to help, no matter what you need.
  • Seek professional assistance: There’s nothing wrong with consulting with a therapist or counselor to learn more about your emotions, how to deal with them and the best way to put the mental side of your divorce in the past. They know how to deal with anything you’re struggling with.

Divorce will change your life in many ways. From the day you decide in favor of it, you’ll feel a variety of emotions. How you deal with them will have an impact on your future.

With your emotions in order, it’s much easier to turn your attention to the details of the divorce process. This allows you to focus your time on things such as seeking physical custody of your children and protecting your individual assets.